closet, en route, Studio

Mein Kleid in der Burda

von Anna

Hallihallo! Ich schaue einmal kurz hier herein um euch zu sagen: Mein Kleid ist in der aktuellen Burda Style! Das Kleid aus der Vintage-Bettwäsche von Mama und dem tollen 50er Schnitt! Im Juni wurde ich vom Burda Team angeschrieben, ob sie mein Kleid veröffentlichen dürften. Natürlich sagte ich ja! Überlegte noch kurz, ob man noch neue Fotos machen sollte (wir hatten damals in der Mittagssonne fotografiert), hatte dafür aber keine Zeit. Sie haben das Foto super bearbeitet und für meinen Gesichtsausdruck kann nur ich was 😉

Ich bin so stolz, diese Veröffentlichung ist fast noch besser, als wenn ich früher meine Artikel in Magazinen zu sehen bekam! Gefunden haben sie mich übrigens über mein Profil in der Burda Community.

Und worüber freut ihr euch an diesem herbstlichen Wochenende? Alles Liebe, Anna

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Anna, closet, Hetty, Studio

It’s 2014! Happy new year!

by Anna

Happy new year!
Happy new year!

Hello and welcome to 2014! We hope everybody entered the new year safe and sound! As you can see above my head is on fire with sparkling new ideas…
New Year's Eve dresses
New Year’s Eve dresses

… and Hetty is catching fire, too! Our new year’s eve dresses are handmade from a Burda vintage pattern. We were adventurous enough to order the velvet online – I am the kind of girl who needs to touch her fabrics to see if I like them – and it worked out! Hettys dress is a pale blue while mine is a silvery grey.
Burda dresses
Burda dresses

The pattern was easy to sew, the velvet made no problems either and we love the waterfall back. Hettys dress has the original length while mine is shortened. (And we are both tall)
Vintage Burda Pattern
Vintage Burda Pattern

We decided to ditch hemming altogether… Why? For a softer drape (is that the correct word?) and a cleaner look.
Hello 2014
Hello 2014

Have a happy, cosy and fun start into the new year! We hope to see you around here!

Anna, Studio

One pillow a week: The hexagon pillow case

Hexagon pillow case
Hexagon pillow case

I made my first quilted object! The quilty things I had made before always were sets, so this pillow case is the first quilted thing I made from scratch. Not counting my quilted placemats though…

For this pillow case I used a template that was published in Burda 3/2013 – yes, that issue really inspired me – and that can be seen here. The explanations start at image 9 and you do not really need to understand German to be able to follow the instructions. The pillow case design and idea are by Jennifer Paganelli of Sis Boom

Making a hexagon pillow
Making a hexagon pillow

For me the most challenging (and most fun!) part in this was to choose the right colors of fabric and to figure out a harmonious yet popping layout. The choice of the fabric type is easy, it should be cotton – no stretch, no stress. Luckily I have a big cotton stash, thanks to those aforementioned tablerunner quilts I made and a chicken purse that never came to life. I needed blues, greens, purples and pinks to go with my living room colors and the sofa quilt. They did not need to be all matchy matchy for me but no opponents on the color wheel either. I cut out the template and started cutting heaxagons, two of each color. In the end I did not use all of them, but it was good to have a choice when playing around to figure out the layout.

Basically the only thing I used from the tutorial was the template. Then I went freestyle. I added no seam allowance because I was ok with hexagons a little smaller than the template. So I cut that exact template size. Also I wanted a smaller and rectangular pillow rather than a square which led me to cut 28 pieces. My cushions backing is solid: an old t-shirt did the trick. Yes, there I used jersey fabric. I figured that a soft back would be nice if I ever wanted to nap on that cushion. Not that I ever take naps…

Hexagons
Hexagons

Then the playing around with fabric begun. The picture shows the layout I was happy with until I sat down at the sewing machine. There I changed some pieces again and again until I really was happy (read could not be bothered anymore and wanted to start). I had put all my pieces on a tray and started to sew columns, meaning I started with a top hexagon and added all the pieces down to the bottom. I used 27 of 28 cut hexagons and ended with six columns. Press open the seams once this is done.

Then the fiddling starts, one begins to sew columns together which is best explained in pictures starting with image 11 Iron the seams. Now it is only a matter of putting a backing on. I placed my hexagon cushion case front onto the t-shirt I wanted to use and cut around it exactly on the edges of the outer hexagons lines. This means you end up with a seam allowance of half a hexagons witdh. This is the part where I wish I had photos to show you… The seam will be only a pressing foot’s width towards the center of the case under the line which would fold the outer hexagon in half. Got it? If you look at the second hexagon in that row it means it has to have a pressing foots width of seam allowance to sew together with the back. Looking from there will make it easier, I promise.

I did three seams and then created and inner pillow. I used the exact dimensions of the pillow case to cut out a nettle version of it, closed three seams, filled as I had done here and closed seam four. Put the pillow case on and you have a brand new pillow made from scratch! The sewing can be done in 30 minutes, if only one could decide how to arrange the pieces… Oh, closing option via ladder stitch shown right here

Geometric pattern
Geometric pattern

This was my first adventure into a new once a week series, all the same it was not the first pillow case I have made this year. The doily covered cushion case I made from scratch as well and then there were Hettys handwritten pillow cover and and my hymn pillow case Stay tuned for next weeks even softer pillow case! ~Anna~

Anna, Hetty, Studio

Adventurous dressmaking: The poppy dress

The poppy dress
The poppy dress

Hetty gave me a dress! Not only just a dress but a hand-made one. And not only just a hand-made dress but the first dress she ever made! Isn’t that the most incredible gift? Nevertheless she is not inspired to write about it and here is why:

“Today it’s me who’s really not inspired to write anything. Maybe it’s because of this dress. I just really don’t know what to write about it. Well, it is a really beautiful pattern, which I adapted from Burda 2/2013, model 122 (I just left out the arms). And the fabric is also one of the most beautiful flowery ones I’ve seen in a long time. But the sad thing is, the dress looks just NOT good on me. The part between the armpits and the waist is too wide and looks weird.

On Anna however, this dress looks really good and she’s very gorgeous in it! This is why you see her in the photos and not me. Mhh, next time I’ll better think about the pattern and if it will suit me before I start sewing something.”

Flowery sundress made by Hetty
Flowery sundress made by Hetty

And I, Anna, love this dress! Like Hetty I love the print – floral is always a print to go to – and for myself I would never have chosen the pattern. I like it on the model but not the drawing. The more I am surprised that it suits me. And then there is the plunging neckline. Is this a neckline at all? It’s a slit that goes well down to my, um, midriff. There were sleeves in the actual dress pattern that Hetty left out for a reason. It’s a sundress after all, right?

It does remind me somewhat of the smocks my grandma used to wear around the house. In a good way! Because this makes me love the poppy dress even more. But are those flowers really poppies? What do you think? ~Anna~

Hetty, Studio

Summer wrap-up part II: Hettys gingham skirt

Hettys gingham skirt
Hettys gingham skirt

Teaching myself different things is something I really like and that I frequently do. But after knitting and skiing somehow I had reached my limit when I tried sewing on my own…. It’s not that I think I couldn’t learn it by myself, but I wanted to learn it fast (as all the things I wanna learn), and so I decided to do a sewing course. This gingham skirt is the first item I made during that course and I must say that I’m proud. Just a tiny little bit…
A handmade checkered skirt
A handmade checkered skirt

The pattern was from Burda (details coming). The checkered fabric made it very easy to cut the pattern and to sew the skirt as I just had to sew along the lines.
Hettys first Burda skirt
Hettys first Burda skirt

It somehow reminds me of a picnic blanket and I could maybe also wear it as a part of a dirndl… or just every day. This surely won’t be the only skirt I have made from that pattern. ~Hetty~
Easy sewing: gingham skirt
Easy sewing: gingham skirt

PS: shirt: New Look, peeptoe wedges: Tchibo.

Anna, Studio

I heart: My halfway handmade dress

A halfway handmade dress
A halfway handmade dress

Hello, tall girls! I am not letting you in on a secret when I admit I have many a top that fittet well – and was long enough – in the shop. After the first wash it has shrunk so much in lenght that it was not wearable any more. Usually after this happens they just hang out in their drawer until the day I decide to donate them. Unless I decide to make them into a dress as I did this time. That’s why this is halfway handmade. And shh, let the seamstress tell you: skirts are way easier to make than tops. So if you are new to sewing this might be a project for you! Continue reading “I heart: My halfway handmade dress”

Hetty, Studio

Pink loose top – the chain top

Hanging loose?
Hanging loose?

Not long after my first sewing attempts I decided to try out another project. In Burda 5/2013 I found a top, which seemed pretty easy.

The sewing pattern was really easy to do, as directions were given for how to draw this pattern. So no tracing of “hidden” lines here, yay!

Pretty pink loose chain top girl
Pretty pink loose chain top girl

I used some bright pink leftover fabric, which I had bought at the Dutch fabric market. Although this decision didn’t seem to be the best and the fabric slipped quite easily and the yarn tension was a horror, I was quite happy with the outcome. Instead of pink yarn I used white one to get a nice contrast.

Also instead of sewing the ribbon to hold the top together, I used the chain of a long necklace I’m not using anymore.

Hanging in there
Hanging in there

I don’t know how Burda sets up their sizing scheme, but usually a size 38/40 is really good for me. But this time it was much too wide and armholes were just too big. I had to stitch it down by at least 4 cm on each side and it is still wide enough.

So, how do you like this bright pink top?